Earthenware phrenological bust, area divisions and

Made:
1860-1896 in London

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Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

"Earthenware phrenological bust, area divisions and labels marked in underglaze black, by L.N. Fowler, London
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

"Earthenware phrenological bust, area divisions and labels marked in underglaze black, by L.N. Fowler, London
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

"Earthenware phrenological bust, area divisions and labels marked in underglaze black, by L.N. Fowler, London
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Earthenware phrenological bust, area divisions and labels marked in underglaze black, by L.N. Fowler, London 1860-1896

Phrenology was the study of the various measurements of the skull to determine character traits. Developed by Franz Joseph Gall at the turn of the 19th century, it quickly gained repute, although also attracted derision. It assumed that particular facets of character and ability were located at specific areas of the brain, that superior development meant an increase in size, and that the shape of the brain was transmitted exactly through the skull. Phrenology suggested the brain could be studied scientifically, but as Stephen J Gould put it, phrenologists were ‘the servants of their numbers’.

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Details

Category:
Psychology, Psychiatry & Anthropometry
Object Number:
A642807
type:
phrenological heads, phrenology phrenological heads, phrenology
status:
Loan: Wellcome Trust

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