Sample of serotonin creatinine sulphate, United States, 1948

Made:
1947-1948 in United States

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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From the top: 1985-1958, Serotonin picrate sample S.P.2 prepared by Maurice Rapport, 1948-1949. 1985-1957, Serotonin
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Group shot of 1985-1956 Single crystal of serotonin creatinine sulphate, the first ever prepared by Maurice Rapport,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Group shot of 1985-1956 Single crystal of serotonin creatinine sulphate, the first ever prepared by Maurice Rapport,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Serotonin creatinine sulphate I sample prepared by Maurice Rapport, 1947-1948

Serotonin was first isolated and described in 1948 by Maurice Rapport, Arda Green (1899-1958) and Irving Page (1901-1911) at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, USA. Serotonin is present in the brain, blood platelets and blood serum and causes contraction of muscles. Changing levels of serotonin are believed to affect a person’s mood. The compound is also a neurotransmitter, carrying nerve impulses across gaps in the nerves known as synapses. Serotonin has also been used to treat clinical depression. Maurice Rapport prepared this sample. It is shown here with similar examples of serotonin (1986-1956 and 1986-1958).

Details

Category:
Biochemistry
Object Number:
1985-1957
type:
sample
taxonomy:
credit:
Presented by Professor Henry McIlwain on behalf of the International Society for Neurochemistry
status:
Permanent collection

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