Replica of Morse's second model of telegraphy apparatus, 1934

Made:
1934 in Munich
maker:
Deutsches Museum

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Replica of Morse's second model of telegraphy apparatus, probably made by the Deutsche Museum, Munich, Germany, 1934. Copy of an original on display in the Deutsche museum, dating from 1846.

This is a replica of Samuel Morse's second model of telegraphy apparatus from 1835. Morse was one of the pioneers of electric telegraphy. Prompted by receiving news of his wife's death too late to attend her funeral, Morse was determined to improve the speed of long distance communications (which at that point relied on horse messengers). Morse invented an instrument that used a current to displace an electro-magnet, which moved a marker, therefore recording the breaks in the current - the invention of Morse Code. At the same time, Cooke and Wheatstone were working on their own electric telegraph in England. Although Morse claimed to conceive the idea earlier, Cooke and Wheatstone were in 1837 the first in the world to patent an electric telegraph system. Morse maintained that he was the true inventor of the electric telegraph, as only his instruments were able to record messages as well as receive them. He asserted that Cooke and Wheatstone's instruments were merely electrical semaphores. The equipment's shows the influence of Theodore Vail, Morse's assistant. The dot and dash signals were embossed onto moving paper tape and a sending key was attached to the frame.

On display

Science Museum: Information Age Gallery: Cable

If you are visiting to see this object, please contact us in advance to make sure that it will be on display.

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1934-545
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), paint, rubber (unidentified), steel (metal), wood (unidentified)
type:
telegraph
taxonomy:
  • component - object
status:
Permanent collection

Cite this page

Rights

We encourage the use and reuse of our collection data.


Data in the title, made, maker and details fields are released under Creative Commons Zero


Descriptions and all other text content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence

Using our data

Download

Download catalogue entry as json

Download manifest IIIF

Our records are constantly being enhanced and improved, but please note that we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information shown on this website.