Replica of Soemmerring's telegraph of 1809-12, 1964

Made:
1964 in Science Museum
maker:
Science Museum

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Replica of Soemmerring's telegraph of 1809/12. Whole object. Grey background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Replica of Soemmerring's telegraph of 1809-12, Science Museum, South Kensington, Kensington and Chelsea, London,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Replica of Soemmerring's telegraph of 1809-12, Science Museum, South Kensington, Kensington and Chelsea, London,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Replica of Sömmerring's telegraph of 1809-12, made by the Science Museum Workshops, South Kensington, London, England, 1964

Replica of Sömmerring's telegraph of 1809-12, made by the Science Museum, South Kensington, 1964.

Samuel Thomas von Sömmerring was a German physician, anatomist and inventor. Although he is most famous for his works on anatomy, Sömmerring also conducted early experiments relating to telegraphy. He attempted to use gas bubbles in water as a signalling device. There was a wire for each letter of the alphabet, and the letters were indicated by the emergence of a stream of gas bubbles. It also had an alarm mechanism for getting the attention of the operator, which trapped the bubbles of gas emitted by the telegraph under a spoon-ended arm, which tilted and released a small stone 'marble', causing it to fall into a glass funnel and hit a lever which started a clockwork bell.

On display

Science Museum: Information Age Gallery

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Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1964-138
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), copper (alloy), glass, wax, wood (unidentified)
type:
telegraph
taxonomy:
  • component - object
status:
Permanent collection

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