Experimental television receiver used by JL Baird in demonstration at Royal Institution, 1926

Made:
1926 in United Kingdom
inventor:
John Logie Baird

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

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Television receiving apparatus used by JL Baird in the demonstration given by him to members of the Royal Institution
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.

Television receiving apparatus used by JL Baird in the demonstration given by him to members of the Royal Institution
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.

Television receiving apparatus used by JL Baird in the demonstration given by him to members of the Royal Institution
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.

Television receiving apparatus used by JL Baird in the demonstration given by him to members of the Royal Institution
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.

Television receiving apparatus used by JL Baird in the demonstration given by him to members of the Royal Institution
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.
Baird Television Company. Enquiries to Science Museum, London.

Television receiving apparatus, made by John Logie Baird, British, 1926. Used by Baird in the demonstration given by him to members of the Royal Institution and others on 27 January 1926.

Television receiving apparatus, made by John Logie Baird, British, 1926.

This receiving apparatus is believed to have been used by John Logie Baird (1888-1946) to demonstrate his mechanical television system to experts, reportedly including members of the Royal Institution and a journalist from The Times. The demonstration took place at Baird’s laboratories at 23 Frith Street, Soho, on 26 January 1926. It consists of a disc, perforated with 30 holes in a spiral, which is arranged to rotate at the same time as a picture scanning disk at the transmitting end. The signals from the transmitter vary in intensity and are made to modulate the light from a neon lamp in the receiver.

On display

Science Museum: Information Age Gallery: Broadcast

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Details

DisplayLocation:
Science Museum, Information Age Gallery: Broadcast
Category:
Radio Communication
Object Number:
1931-57
Materials:
brass (copper, glass, wood (unidentified), zinc alloy)
type:
television receiver
taxonomy:
  • component - object
credit:
From Baird Television Limited
status:
Loan

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