CO2 gas-powered artificial arms, Roehampton, England, 1963

Made:
1963 in Roehampton
maker:
Hugh Steeper

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

A pair of CO2 gas-powered artificial arms for a young child, 1963. Pair of artificial arms for a very young child born
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Early pair of CO2 gas powered prostheses for a very young child born with very short upper limbs (phocomelia) due to Thalidomide. Plastic arms and forearms with spade-like hands. Friction joints permitting abduction and rotation at the shoulders and rotation and flexion at the elbows respectively. The limbs were positioned by an Occupational Therapist and fixed by tightening the large slotted screws, with the aid of a coin. When the two elbows are set at 900 and the front valve is activated the hands come together. Likewise the hands part when the rear valve is activated. Each valve is connected, by a nylon cord, to a leather waist belt (or lower limb prostheses if worn). Forward bending of the trunk opens the rear valve and the reverse movement causes the front valve to operate. N.B. Limbs such as these, were worn for short training periods each day until the child could progress to more sophisticated prostheses. Made by Steeper 1963.

Pair of artificial arms for a very young child born with a virtual absence of upper limbs due to the effects of the drug thalidomide. The prostheses, made by Steeper, has plastic arms with simple spade-like hands, known as 'patter-cake' hands. The unit contains a small number of valves which can be activated by movements of the upper body. Forward bending of the trunk opens the rear valve and brings the hands together and the reverse movement causes the front valve to operate and the hands to part. Limbs such as these were worn for short training periods each day until the child could progress to more sophisticated prostheses. Made at the Limb Fitting Centre at Queen Mary's Hospital, Roehampton, London, 1963

Details

Category:
Orthopaedics
Object Number:
1999-578
Materials:
metal, plastic, textile
Measurements:
overall (arms each): 320 mm x 40 mm x 40 mm,
overall (body): 170 mm x 310 mm x 140 mm, .87kg
type:
artificial arm
credit:
Richmond Twickenham and Roehampton Healthcare NHS Trust
status:
Permanent collection

Cite this page

Rights

We encourage the use and reuse of our collection data.


Data in the title, made, maker and details fields are released under Creative Commons Zero


Descriptions and all other text content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence

Using our data

Download

Download catalogue entry as json

Download manifest IIIF

Our records are constantly being enhanced and improved, but please note that we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information shown on this website.