'The Palmer Injector', Glasgow, Scotland, 1955-1970

1955-1979 in Glasgow
Palmer Injectors Limited

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'The Palmer Injector' with instruction leaflet in original box. The object simplifies and improves the process of self-injection. In the form of a gun which can be operated with either hand in any part of the body, by Palmer Injectors Ltd, 1950-79.

Charles Palmer, a diabetic, invented this device in 1955 to make self-administered insulin injections easier. People with diabetes need regular insulin injections to normalise their blood sugar levels. In Palmer’s device, the syringe is attached to the gun-shaped steel handle, which can be used in either hand, and applied to any part of the body. ‘The Palmer Injector’ was also used to give diphtheria vaccinations and injections of the antibiotic penicillin.

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Science Museum: Journeys through Medicine: Henry Wellcome's Legacy

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Object Number:
injector: 113 mm x 160 mm x 37 mm, .1125 kg
Unknown source
Permanent collection

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