Pupil measuring scale, London, England, 1974

Made:
1974 in London
maker:
Medical and Industrial Equipment Limited

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Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Simple device for measuring pupil size, first of its kind, designed by Dr Gilston. This one was made for the First World Congress on Intensive Care, London 1974, which Gilston initiated and organised. The First World Congress records are held now by the Intensive Care Society, Tavistock House, Tavistock Sq, WC1. For use in cardio-respiratory resuscitation and coma assessment. Made 1974.

Eye pupil size was measured in patients during cardio-respiratory resuscitation and coma assessment by this simple device. This is the first of its kind made for the First World Congress on Intensive Care, held in London in 1974. It was invented by Dr Alan Gilston. The plastic ruler has holes representing pupil dilation at various stages. Change in pupil size can be triggered involuntarily by exposure to bright light and this can be used as a guide to brain activity. Such changes to the pupil can also be caused by strokes, brain tumours, head injuries and the use of illegal drugs. This simple low-tech device is a quick reference tool for physicians in critical care situations.

Dr Alan Gilston was the senior Consultant Anaesthetist at the National Heart Hospital, London. He established the Intensive Care Society in 1974. He initiated the First World Congress on Intensive and Critical Care Medicine later that year.

Details

Category:
Anaesthesiology
Identifier:
1999-788
type:
pupil measuring device
credit:
Gilston, Alan
status:
Permanent collection

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