German armillary sphere, 1553

Made:
1553 in Cologne, Germany and North Rhine-Westphalia
maker:
Caspar Vopel
and
Caspar Vopel
and

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Made by Caspar Vopel in Cologne, Germany in 1522, this brass armillary sphere has a turned wooden stand. A broad band,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Made by Caspar Vopel in Cologne, Germany in 1522, this brass armillary sphere has a turned wooden stand. A broad band,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Armillary sphere; brass, 5 1/2-inches diameter on small turned painted wooden stand. Overall height just less than 8 inches. Inscribed on tropic of cancer: "Caspar Vopelius Mathe. Professor Ubiorum Coloniae Hanc Sphaeram Faciebat Anno. 1553". Earth represented by brass ball at centre; four movable circles for Moon, Sun, Jupiter and Saturn.

Made by Caspar Vopel in Cologne, Germany in 1522, this brass armillary sphere has a turned wooden stand. A broad band, finely engraved with the star patterns of the Zodiac encircles the instrument. The armillary sphere is a demonstration device to explain the movements of the Sun, Moon, stars and planets across the sky. Its interlocking rings can be used to teach astronomical principles in same manner as a celestial globe or act as a model the universe. Based on the premise of an Earth centred universe, the armillary sphere was modified in the seventeenth century to teach the theory that the Earth orbits the Sun.

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Details

Category:
Astronomy
Object Number:
1952-223
Materials:
brass, wood
type:
armillary sphere
taxonomy:
  • disciplines
  • disciplines
  • science
  • natural sciences
  • physical sciences
  • visual and verbal communication
  • globe - cartographic sphere
  • celestial globe
credit:
Backer, H.E.
status:
Permanent collection

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