Phillip's Economic Computer

Made:
1949
inventor:
Bill Phillips
maker:
White Ellerton Limited

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Phillips Economic Analog Computer. The machine was conceived by Bill Phillips (1914-1975), a New Zealand-born engineer
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economic Analog Computer. The machine was conceived by Bill Phillips (1914-1975), a New Zealand-born engineer
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economic Analog Computer. The machine was conceived by Bill Phillips (1914-1975), a New Zealand-born engineer
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economic Analog Computer. The machine was conceived by Bill Phillips (1914-1975), a New Zealand-born engineer
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economics Analog Computer, devised by Bill Phillips at the London School of Economics, 1949 known as MONIAC
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economics Analog Computer, devised by Bill Phillips at the London School of Economics, 1949 known as MONIAC
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economics Analog Computer, devised by Bill Phillips at the London School of Economics, 1949 known as MONIAC
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economics Analog Computer, devised by Bill Phillips at the London School of Economics, 1949 known as MONIAC
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Phillips Economics Analog Computer, devised by Bill Phillips at the London School of Economics, 1949 known as MONIAC [Monetary National Income Analogue Computer]

Phillips Economic Analog Computer. The machine was conceived by Bill Phillips (1914-1975), a New Zealand-born engineer turned economist. He designed the machine to demonstrate in a visual way the circular flow of money within the economy. Approximately fourteen machines were built, and this particular machine was used as a teaching aid at the London School of Economics. It ran until May 1992.

On display

Science Museum: Mathematics: The Winton Gallery

If you are visiting to see this object, please contact us in advance to make sure that it will be on display.

Details

Category:
Computing & Data Processing
Object Number:
1995-210
type:
analog computer
credit:
Suntory-Toyota International Centre
status:
Permanent collection

Cite this page

Rights

We encourage the use and reuse of our collection data.


Data in the title, made, maker and details fields are released under Creative Commons Zero


Descriptions and all other text content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence

Using our data

Download

Download catalogue entry as json

Our records are constantly being enhanced and improved, but please note that we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information shown on this website.