Daniell cell used by Edward Davy, 1836-1839

Made:
1836-1839 in England
inventor:
Edward Davy

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

1923-232/1: Daniell cell used and possibly made by Edward Davy, England, 1836-1839. Found in a field in Somerset by J J
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

1923-232/1: Daniell cell used and possibly made by Edward Davy, England, 1836-1839. Found in a field in Somerset by J J
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

1923-232/1: Daniell cell used and possibly made by Edward Davy, England, 1836-1839. Found in a field in Somerset by J J
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

1923-232/1: Daniell cell used and possibly made by Edward Davy, England, 1836-1839. Found in a field in Somerset by J J
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Daniell cell used and possibly made by Edward Davy, England, 1836-1839. Found in a field in Somerset by J J Fahie, an historian of the electric telegraph, in 1883. The Daniell Cell is named after John Frederic Daniell, who invented it in 1836, and is a form of electro-chemical battery. Daniell cells use copper in copper sulphate and zinc in zinc sulphate, each in a separate pot. The two are connected by a salt bridge, which allows ions to move from one pot to another, so generating an electric charge. This particular Daniell cell is believed to have been used by Edward Davy, who in 1837-8 was a rival to Cooke and Wheatstone in developing a practical electric telegraph. For personal reasons Davy emigrated to Australia in 1838 and his experimental apparatus was stored. Sadly most of it was destroyed later but a few Daniell cells were found and rescued, of which this is one.

On display

Science Museum: Information Age Gallery: Cable

If you are visiting to see this object, please contact us in advance to make sure that it will be on display.

Related people

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1923-232/1
Materials:
ceramic (unspecified), glaze
Measurements:
overall (diameter at base): 475 mm 220 mm, 7.18 kg
type:
battery
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
credit:
Donated by the Institution of Electrical Engineers
status:
Permanent collection

Cite this page

Rights

We encourage the use and reuse of our collection data.


Data in the title, made, maker and details fields are released under Creative Commons Zero


Descriptions and all other text content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence

Using our data

Download

Download catalogue entry as json

Download manifest IIIF

Our records are constantly being enhanced and improved, but please note that we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information shown on this website.