Bottle of 'Livingstone Rousers', London, England, 1880-1990

Made:
1880-1900 in London
maker:
Burroughs Wellcome and Company Limited

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Glass bottle of Livingstone Rousers, by Burroughs Wellcome, 1880-1900

‘Livingstone Rousers’ are named after the man who invented them – the famous explorer and missionary David Livingstone (1813-1873). Exploring Africa meant Europeans encountered illnesses that they were unused to, such as malaria. Livingstone prepared a treatment from quinine, jalap, rhubarb and calomel to combat fevers and malaria and to purge the body. A label on the bottle reads “From Stanley Expedition”. This may be a reference to Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), another famous explorer who had close links with Henry Wellcome. The tablets were made by Burroughs, Wellcome & Co until the 1920s.

Details

Category:
Medical Glass-ware
Object Number:
A630855 Pt4
Materials:
cork, glass, materia medica, paper (fibre product)
type:
bottle
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • container - receptacle
  • vessel
status:
Loan: Wellcome Trust

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