Movement of regulator clock by Vulliamy, about 1760

Made:
1760 in London
maker:
Benjamin Vulliamy

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Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

A regulator clock is a highly accurate timepiece, usually used for making precise measurements in conjunction with
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

A regulator clock is a highly accurate timepiece, usually used for making precise measurements in conjunction with
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

A regulator clock is a highly accurate timepiece, usually used for making precise measurements in conjunction with
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

A regulator clock is a highly accurate timepiece, usually used for making precise measurements in conjunction with
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Clock made by Benjamin Vulliamy for His Majesty George III, and used in his Observatory at Kew. In polished mahogany case, with a side plate and glass top for case

A regulator clock is a highly accurate timepiece, usually used for making precise measurements in conjunction with astronomical observation. This is the movement from a clock made by Benjamin Vulliamy (1747-1811) for George III that was used as the principal timekeeper at the King's Observatory at Kew. Rollers act as the bearings for the wheelwork, reducing the friction and the need for lubrication. For similar reasons the clock was also fitted with the grasshopper escapement invented by the pioneer of the chronometer, John Harrison (1693-1776). Harrison`s gridiron pendulum was also incorporated to ensure that the clock kept good time by compensating for changes of temperature.

Related people

Details

Category:
Time Measurement
Object Number:
1884-79
Materials:
case: mahogany, escapement pallets: hardwood, glass
type:
weight-driven pendulum clocks
credit:
Patent Office Museum
status:
Permanent collection

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