Crocodile-shaped iron cork press, Portugal, 1801-1900

Made:
1801-1900 in Portugal
maker:
Unknown

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Iron cork presser shaped like a stylised crocodile, Portugese

Until the 1930s, corks were used to seal bottles of medical preparations so they could be taken home by the customer. Corks needed to be pressed and moulded in order to fit the bottle top. This crocodile-shaped cork presser has four different sized holes for pressing corks and is worked by lifting the tail up and down. Each foot of the crocodile has a hole for a screw so it can be attached to a bench. The cork press would have been made by a manufacturing chemist or pharmacist.

Details

Category:
Pharmacy-ware
Object Number:
A640410
Materials:
complete, iron
Measurements:
undefined
type:
cork press
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • press - mechanical
status:
Loan: Wellcome Trust

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