Potter-Bucky diaphragm used in radiology, England, 1940-1950

Made:
1940-1950 in England
maker:
Unknown

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Potter Bucky diaphragm, sectioned, English, 1940-1950

Early X-ray plates were blurred due to the scattering of rays by body tissue. Radiologists Gustav Bucky (1880–1963) and Hollis E. Potter (1880-1964) worked independently on this problem from about 1913. A section of the resultant Bucky-Potter Diaphragm is shown. It was placed between the patient and the X-ray film. Parallel lead strips move across inside the wooden casing during an exposure. They block scattered rays travelling at other angles. The lead strips are not visible on the X-ray film because they are moving. The device was first marketed in 1921. It has become standard equipment on X-ray tables.

Details

Category:
Radiomedicine
Object Number:
1980-1221
Materials:
aluminium, steel
type:
x-ray accessory
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • x-ray machine
credit:
Hypher, T.J.
status:
Permanent collection

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