Diorama showing the anatomy theatre at Padua in 1594, England, 1901-1950

Made:
1901-1950 in London

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Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Scale model of anatomy theatre built at Padua in 1594 showing dissection taking place, English, 1900-1950

The first permanent anatomy theatre for dissections was built in 1594 at the University of Padua, one of the largest and most influential medical schools of the time. The theatre could hold three hundred students who were no more than eleven metres from the dissecting table. Human dissection is one way for medical students to learn anatomy. Hieronymus Fabricius ab Acquapendente (1537-1619), who had been professor of surgery and anatomy since 1562, taught his students in the anatomy theatre. His students included William Harvey (1578-1657), who went on to discover the circulation of the blood. The anatomy theatre can still be visited today.

Details

Category:
Therapeutics
Object Number:
A625521
Materials:
glass, metal, paint, wax, wood
Measurements:
overall (viewing aperture): 1477 mm x 761 mm x 865 mm,
overall (with structure): 1625 mm x 782 mm x 899 mm,
type:
diorama
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
status:
Loan: Wellcome Trust

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