Soft toy, with cochlear implant, China, 1999

Made:
1999 in China
maker:
Advanced Bionics UK Limited
'Clarion" Cougar' soft toy with cochlear implant, by Advanced Bionics UK Ltd., 1999.
      Full view, graduated matt black 'Clarion" Cougar' soft toy with cochlear implant, by Advanced Bionics UK Ltd., 1999.
      Detail view of hearing aid behind 'Clarion? Cougar' soft toy with cochlear implant, marketed by Advanced Bionics UK Ltd., made in China, 1999.

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'Clarion" Cougar' soft toy with cochlear implant, by Advanced Bionics UK Ltd., 1999. Full view, graduated matt black
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

'Clarion" Cougar' soft toy with cochlear implant, by Advanced Bionics UK Ltd., 1999. Detail view of hearing aid behind
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

'Clarion? Cougar' soft toy with cochlear implant, marketed by Advanced Bionics UK Ltd., made in China, 1999.
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

'Clarion™ Cougar' soft toy with cochlear implant, marketed by Advanced Bionics UK Ltd., made in China, 1999.

Some profoundly deaf people can hear sound with the aid of cochlear implants. This has been possible since the late 1970s. This soft toy was developed by Advanced Bionics UK Limited as a teaching aid to explain and reassure children about the medical procedure. Cochlear implants electrically stimulate the auditory nerve therefore bypassing the inner ear. They consist of three parts: the internal component implanted behind the ear, the headpiece worn behind the ear and the external speech processor usually worn on a belt. Some people in the Deaf community consider cochlear implants could be interpreted as ‘normalising’ deaf people. Others argue deafness should not be considered a disability, but a cultural identity.

Details

Category:
Audiology
Object Number:
2000-1159
Materials:
felt, paper, plastic, polyester fibre filling, printing ink, textile fur fabric and woven textile
type:
toys (recreational artifacts)
taxonomy:
  • recreational artifacts
  • furnishing and equipment
  • toy - recreational artefact
credit:
Advanced Bionics UK Limited