Murphy-type chloroform inhaler

Made:
1850-1900 in Europe
maker:
Unknown

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Murphy's inhaler for chloroform anaesthesia in midwifery, no maker marked, 1850-1900

Edward William Murphy (1802-1877) invented this chloroform inhaler in 1848-1850. It was used for pain relief during medical procedures. The main drum held a sponge soaked with chloroform, the vapours of which were breathed in by the patient through the trumpet-shaped mouthpiece.

Murphy’s inhaler was mostly used in obstetrics and child birth as it was small and easy to use. It was portable and could be held by the patient instead of the doctor – so he was free to aid the birth. Chloroform was first used as a pain reliever in childbirth in 1847.

Details

Category:
Anaesthesiology
Object Number:
1981-1549
Materials:
iron, paint, sponge
type:
inhaler
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
credit:
University College Hospital, London

Cite this page

Rights

We encourage the use and reuse of our collection data.


Data in the title, made, maker and details fields are released under Creative Commons Zero


Descriptions and all other text content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence

Using our data

Download

Download catalogue entry as json

Download manifest IIIF

Our records are constantly being enhanced and improved, but please note that we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information shown on this website.