Culture plate of penicillium mould, London, England, 1963

Made:
1963 in Greenford
maker:
Unknown

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

One of two imitation culture plates of penicillium mould, c. 1963

This is a replica of the culture plate on which penicillin was discovered. In 1928 Alexander Fleming (1881-1995), a British bacteriologist, observed that a stray growth of Penicillium mould could affect colonies of bacteria. Around the felt-like greenish mould he noticed a sterile area where the growth of bacteria had been stopped by Penicillium. However, penicillin’s nature and potential use as an antibiotic were not immediately obvious to him and so it was not isolated or developed commercially until the early 1940s.

Details

Category:
Biotechnology
Object Number:
1963-374/2
type:
culture plate