One of the first rechargeable batteries, about 1860

Made:
1860 in London
maker:
Gaston Planté

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Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Planté rechargeable lead-acid battery. The secondary cell (or rechargeable cell) in which the positive active material
Science Museum Group Collections.
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Planté rechargeable lead-acid battery. The secondary cell (or rechargeable cell) in which the positive active material
Science Museum Group Collections.
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Planté rechargeable lead-acid battery. The secondary cell (or rechargeable cell) in which the positive active material
Science Museum Group Collections.
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Planté rechargeable lead-acid battery. The secondary cell (or rechargeable cell) in which the positive active material
Science Museum Group Collections.
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Planté rechargeable lead-acid battery. The secondary cell (or rechargeable cell) in which the positive active material
Science Museum Group Collections.
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

The first practical lead-acid storage battery. Made by Gaston Planté in London around 1860.

The secondary cell (or rechargeable cell) in which the positive active material is lead peroxide, the negative active material is pure lead and the electrolyte is dilute sulphuric acid, was introduced French physicist Gaston Planté (1834-1889) in 1860. It was the first practical storage battery.

The battery shown here dates from around 1860 and consists of 20 cells, arranged in a form used for experimental and laboratory purposes, with a switch for connecting the cells either in series or in parallel.

On display

Science and Industry Museum: Temporary Exhibitions Gallery: Electricity: The Spark of Life

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Details

Category:
Electricity Supply
Object Number:
1887-70
Materials:
copper alloy, glass, lead, pitch or bitumen insulating materials, rubber-covered wiring, wood (possibly teak)
type:
lead-acid rechargeable batteries
credit:
Normal School of Science (Physical Laboratory)
status:
Permanent collection

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